Category Archives: Stem Cells

RenovaCare SkinGun™ Stem Cell Sprayer on Exhibit at the Science Museum in London

RenovaCare, Inc. (OTCQB: RCAR), developer of the SkinGun™ and CellMist™ System for isolating and spraying a patient’s own stem cells onto burns and wounds for rapid self-healing, today announced the first-ever public display of its breakthrough technology, on exhibit now at the UK’s prestigious Science Museum in London.

Featured in the Tomorrow’s World gallery is the latest iteration of the RenovaCare SkinGun™, a futuristic, easy-to-use hand held medical device that delivers a healing mist of stem cells to wounds using an ultra-gentle spray technology.

Today’s SkinGun™ is a significant technological enhancement over its predecessor, that was used successfully to treat a variety of severe burn injuries including gas and chemical explosions, as well as electrical, gasoline, hot water and tar scalding burns.
(Click here to view before-after patient photos)

In as little as 90 minutes a burn patient’s own stem cells are isolated from a sample of healthy skin and sprayed on to wounds for rapid healing. The donor area is tiny, as small as one square inch. The harvested cells are suspended in saline and gently sprayed with RenovaCare’s SkinGun™.

As in the case of State Trooper Matt Uram – one of dozens of burn victims treated to date – patients are able to leave the hospital within only a few days. Current treatments, such as skin grafting, require hospital stays of many weeks while patients undergo painful, costly, and often disfiguring surgeries.

(Click here to watch video of State Trooper’s Stem Cell Recovery)

*RenovaCare products are currently in development. They are not available for sale in the United States. There is no assurance that the company’s planned or filed submissions to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, if any, will be accepted or cleared by the FDA.

About the Science Museum

As the home of human ingenuity, the Science Museum’s world-class collection forms an enduring record of scientific, technological and medical achievements from across the globe. Welcoming over three million visitors a year, the Museum aims to make sense of the science that shapes our lives, inspiring visitors with iconic objects, award-winning exhibitions and incredible stories of scientific achievement. More information can be found at sciencemuseum.org.uk.

About the RenovaCare

RenovaCare, Inc. is developing first-of-their-kind autologous (self-donated) stem cell therapies for the regeneration of human organs, and novel medical grade liquid sprayer devices.

RenovaCare, Inc. is developing first-of-its-kind autologous (self-donated) stem cell therapies for the regeneration of human organs. Its initial product under development targets the body’s largest organ, the skin. The company’s flagship technology, the CellMist™ System, uses its patented SkinGun™ to spray a liquid suspension of a patient’s stem cells – the CellMist™ Solution – onto wounds. RenovaCare is developing its CellMist™ System as a promising new alternative for patients suffering from burns, chronic and acute wounds, and scars. In the US alone, this $45 billion market is greater than the spending on high-blood pressure management, cholesterol treatments, and back pain therapeutics.

Amount of water in stem cells can determine its fate as fat or bone

Top images (A): Illustrates the development of stem cells on hydrogel, a soft substrate, to pre-bone cells after the removal of water. Bottom images (B): Depicts the development of stem cells on glass, a hard substrate, to pre-fat cells after the addition of water. Photo: Courtesy of the researchers

Study is first to find cell volume can influence the future role of stem cells, regardless of environment.

By Marcene Robinson
Release Date: September 26, 2017

Adding or removing water from a stem cell can change the destiny of the cell, researchers have discovered in a new study published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

The research found that altering the volume of a cell changed its internal dynamics, including the rigidness of the matrix lining the outer surface. In stem cells, removing water condenses the cell, influencing the stem cells to become stiff pre-bone cells, while adding water causes the cells to swell, forming soft pre-fat cells.

Cardiac Stem Cells from Young Hearts Could Rejuvenate Old Hearts, New Study Shows

Animal Study Reveals That Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Secrete Tiny Vesicles That Could ‘Turn Back the Clock’ for Age-Related Heart Conditions


LOS ANGELES (AUG. 14, 2017) – Cardiac stem cell infusions could someday help reverse the aging process in the human heart, making older ones behave younger, according to a new study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

“Our previous lab studies and human clinical trials have shown promise in treating heart failure using cardiac stem cell infusions,” said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the primary investigator of the study. “Now we find that these specialized stem cells could turn out to reverse problems associated with aging of the heart.”

The study was published today by the European Heart Journal.

How Stem Cells Know What to Become

How do stem cells know what type of cell they are supposed to become? Ph.D. student Jack Allen explains this and the research being done in the lab of Dr. Ricardo Zayas on tissue regeneration. Find out more here: http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/faculty/zayas/index.html

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system

Image courtesy of Toni Celià-Terrassa and Yibin Kang, Department of Molecular Biology

Researchers from Princeton University’s Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this “microRNA” promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this molecule could improve the efficacy of existing breast cancer therapies.

Stem cells give rise to the different cell types in adult tissues but, in order to maintain these tissues throughout adulthood, stem cells must retain their activity for decades. They do this by “self-renewing,” dividing to form additional stem cells, and resisting the effects of environmental signals that would otherwise cause them to prematurely differentiate into other cell types.

Many tumors also contain so-called “cancer stem cells” that can drive tumor formation. Some tumors, such as triple-negative breast cancers, are particularly deadly because they contain large numbers of cancer stem cells that self-renew and resist differentiation.

Boston University scientists turn human induced pluripotent stem cells into lung cells

‘Bronchospheres’ may pave way for personalized cystic fibrosis treatments

Human lungs, like all organs, begin their existence as clumps of undifferentiated stem cells. But in a matter of months, the cells get organized. They gather together, branch and bud, some forming airways and others alveoli, the delicate sacs where our bodies exchange oxygen for carbon dioxide. The end result, ideally: two healthy, breathing lungs.

For years, scientists who study lung diseases like cystic fibrosis have tried to track this process in detail, from start to finish, in the hope that understanding how lungs form normally may help explain how things go wrong. Now, scientists at Boston University’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) have announced two major findings that further our understanding of this process: the ability to grow and purify the earliest lung progenitors that emerge from human stem cells, and the ability to differentiate these cells into tiny “bronchospheres” that model cystic fibrosis. Researchers hope that the results, published separately in the Journal of Clinical Investigation and Cell Stem Cell, will lead to new, “personalized medicine” approaches to treating lung disease.

Stem Cell Therapy for Arachnoiditis Helps a Tennessee Woman Walk Again

Chronic disease can present challenges for patients and their families on many levels, from the emotional to the physical. For many, the growing realization that there is no cure for their illness can lead to frustration at best as they learn to adapt their daily routine, quality of life and plans for the future to a new reality.

Such was the case for Dr. Sara Davis when her active life as a wife, mother and physician was turned on its head by arachnoiditis, a chronic pain disorder affecting the spinal nerves. Dr. Davis was eventually confined to a wheelchair and struggled daily with pain, lack of mobility and the inability to perform many menial tasks. As a physician, she continued to search for new avenues of treatment and held out hope that something would someday cure her condition or improve her symptoms. Stem cell therapy became that ray of hope in 2015 when her research led her to Dr. Todd Malan and his advanced use of stem cell therapies that were available worldwide, but not FDA approved in the U.S.

Watch Sara’s story:

NIH-funded study helps explain how zebrafish recover from blinding injuries

Decrease in neurotransmitter GABA triggers stem cell production in the retina.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, have discovered that in zebrafish, decreased levels of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cue the retina, the light-sensing tissue in the back of the eye, to produce stem cells. The finding sheds light on how the zebrafish regenerates its retina after injury and informs efforts to restore vision in people who are blind. The research was funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) and appears online today in Stem Cell Reports. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

“This work opens up new ideas for therapies for blinding diseases and has implications for the broader field of regenerative medicine,” said Tom Greenwell, Ph.D., NEI program officer for retinal neuroscience.

Stem cell transplants may induce long-term remission of multiple sclerosis

Encouraging results help set stage for larger studies.

New clinical trial results provide evidence that high-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by transplantation of a person’s own blood-forming stem cells can induce sustained remission of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the central nervous system.

Five years after receiving the treatment, called high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HDIT/HCT), 69 percent of trial participants had survived without experiencing progression of disability, relapse of MS symptoms or new brain lesions. Notably, participants did not take any MS medications after receiving HDIT/HCT. Other studies have indicated that currently available MS drugs have lower success rates.

The trial, called HALT-MS, was sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded Immune Tolerance Network (ITN). The researchers published three-year results from the study in December 2014, and the final five-year results appear online Feb. 1 in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Mathematics of Stem Cells

Presented by the University of California Irvine School of Physical Sciences. Cell populations are complex. Their collective functioning, turnover, and cooperation are at the basis of the life of multicellular organisms, such as humans. When this goes wrong, an unwanted evolutionary process can begin that leads to cancer. Mathematics cannot cure cancer, but it can be used to understand some of its aspects, which is an essential step in winning the battle.