International Stem Cell Begins Pre-Clinical Testing of Its Parthenogenetic Stem Cells for Treatment of Retinal Disease

First Company To Grow Human Corneal Tissue From Stem Cells

Oceanside, California,  January 13, 2009 — International Stem Cell Corporation
(OTCBB: ISCO) has created layered human tissue from its unique parthenogenetic stem cells and transplanted this tissue into animals in pre-clinical trials to establish a potential new treatment for human retinal diseases, such as macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa.

“Intact layers of retinal progenitor cells have been shown to restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration rodent models,” said Dr. Hans Keirstead, Co-Director of the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at the University of California, Irvine.
“Thus, we are developing intact retinal layers derived from International Stem Cell’s human parthenogenetic stem cells which could become a sustainable, FDA-approved therapeutic supply for patients with retinal degenerative diseases.”

ISCO’s human parthenogenetic stem cells have the potential to treat human disease yet possess key medical and ethical advantages over other kinds of stem cell products. They can be matched to common immune types and thus reduce the chance of transplant rejection among large segments of the population. Because they are created from unfertilized human eggs, they do not require the destruction of human embryos.

“We are aggressively pushing forward safe treatments for human diseases using
parthenogenetic stem cells,” said Jeffrey Janus, President of International Stem Cell.

“If we are successful in this work, our next step is to manufacture this layered human tissue for further tests, including human trials. This illustrates the strengths of combining scientific collaborations with outside researchers such as Dr. Keirstead with ISCO’s science and cell manufacturing expertise.”

For more information, visit the ISCO website at: www.internationalstemcell.com