Stem cell treatment for peripheral artery disease

Stem cells taken from placentas are helping people walk again without pain.

HealthFirst reporter Leslie Toldo shows us how this experimental therapy may help millions of people.

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Stem Cell Research Breakthrough

A new technique makes the practice of turning adult skin cells into stem cells much faster and more efficient.

Stem cells used to clear-up clogged arteries

Doctors are using stem cells to create new blood vessels to treat peripheral arterial disease.

Stem Cell-Engineered Windpipe for Cancer Patients

From abcnews.com

Doctors in Italy announced they have used patients’ own stem cells to grow trachea tissue that led to seemingly successful transplanted windpipes in two patients diagnosed with trachea cancer.

View from the Top – Kenneth Aldrich, International Stem Cell Corporation

Kenneth Aldrich, Chairman of International Stem Cell Corporation, discusses the next generation of therapeutic stem cells.

Researchers Use Stem Cells From Patients’ Own Eyes to Restore Sight

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Is Stem Cell Research Making Progress?

Three distinguished researchers join NPR host Ira Flatow to discuss the latest adult and embryonic stem cell research news, and explain how the research may be used in humans.

Listen to the Story at NPR

Stem Cells Could Change Diabetes Treatment

Doctors say stem cell transplants could help people with Type 1 diabetes live insulin-free lives; the stem cells come from the patient’s own body.

From clipsyndicate.com

CBR: Umbilical Stem Cell Overview

Cord Blood Registry Launches Industry-Leading Innovations for Newborn Stem Cell Collection

New Collection System Offers Parents Opportunity to Preserve a Greater Number and Diversity of Their Newborn’s Umbilical Cord Stem Cells for More Potential Therapeutic Uses

Cord Blood Registry (CBR), the global leader in the collection and preservation of newborn stem cells from the umbilical cord, announced today the launch of its new stem cell collection system that saves a greater number and diversity of a newborn’s stem cells – from both the blood in the umbilical cord and the cord tissue itself – for a wider range of potential therapeutic uses.

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Official definition of human embryonic stem cells widened in US

By Dr Philippa Brice, PHGFoundation.org

The official definition of human embryonic stem (HES) cells in US National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines is to be broadened from those ‘derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst stage human embryo’ (ie. from embryos that have reached the blastocyst stage at four or five days old, 70-100 cells), to include also those derived from earlier stage embryos.

Dr Lana Skirboll, director of the Office of Science Policy of the NIH, reportedly said: “We are making what I think is a relatively small technical change to the definition of human embryonic stem cells…This changes none of the ethical requirements in the guidelines” (see Reuters news). This move was prompted by an application from a commercial source to list cell lines derived from eight-cell stage embryos, and will make some commercial and academic research programs potentially eligible for government funding.

Derivation of HES cells from a cell taken from an eight-cell stage embryo could possibly allow implantation and normal development of the remaining seven-cell embryo. This is what happens in pre-implantation prenatal diagnosis (PGD); one cell is removed for genetic analysis and, if healthy, the seven-cell embryo is implanted and can grow into a normal fetus.