A Changing View of Bone Marrow Cells

Caltech researchers show that the cells are actively involved in sensing infection.

RESEARCHERS SEPARATE BLOOD STEM CELLS FROM OTHER BONE MARROW CELLS AND LOAD THEM ONTO A NEW MICROFLUIDIC CHIP. FLUORESCENT SIGNALS INDICATE THE PRESENCE OF SECRETED PROTEINS WITH ONE "BARCODE" REPRESENTING EACH CELL.

RESEARCHERS SEPARATE BLOOD STEM CELLS FROM OTHER BONE MARROW CELLS AND LOAD THEM ONTO A NEW MICROFLUIDIC CHIP. FLUORESCENT SIGNALS INDICATE THE PRESENCE OF SECRETED PROTEINS WITH ONE “BARCODE” REPRESENTING EACH CELL.

In the battle against infection, immune cells are the body’s offense and defense—some cells go on the attack while others block invading pathogens. It has long been known that a population of blood stem cells that resides in the bone marrow generates all of these immune cells. But most scientists have believed that blood stem cells participate in battles against infection in a delayed way, replenishing immune cells on the front line only after they become depleted.

Now, using a novel microfluidic technique, researchers at Caltech have shown that these stem cells might be more actively involved, sensing danger signals directly and quickly producing new immune cells to join the fight.

“It has been most people’s belief that the bone marrow has the function of making these cells but that the response to infection is something that happens locally, at the infection site,” says David Baltimore, president emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech. “We’ve shown that these bone marrow cells themselves are sensitive to infection-related molecules and that they respond very rapidly. So the bone marrow is actually set up to respond to infection.”

High hopes for space grown stem cells

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are preparing to test their theory that stem cells grow faster in microgravity. With a grant from an organisation that promotes research aboard the International Space Station, Dr Abba Zubair will send a batch of cells into space where he believes the future of human tissue generation with stem cells may lie. Ben Gruber reports.

Video provided by Reuters

Stem cell power unleashed after 30 minute dip in acid

The revolutionary discovery that any cell can be rewound to a pre-embryonic state remarkably easily could usher in new therapies and cloning techniques

Click here for complete article.

A Brief History of Stem Cells

A timeline spanning 60 years of stem cell research.
Reporting by Kevin Mayer/ Video by Sunya Bhutta
From GEN Publishing

Stem Cells, and Blood Cells, and Blood Counts, Oh My!

University of California, San Francisco, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public

Stem cell therapy shows promise in repairing brain damage even hours after stroke occurs

Durham, NC – Stroke is a major health concern and is a leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Center for Disease Control. Despite significant research efforts, developing treatments that ensure complete recovery for stroke patients poses an extreme challenge, especially when more than a few hours have passed between onset of the stroke and administration of treatment.

However, a new study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that endothelial precursor cells, which are found in the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and as very rare cells in peripheral blood, could make a significant difference for these patients’ recovery — even in the later stages of stroke. In animal studies, the treatment minimized the initial brain injury and helped repair the stroke damage.

Stem Cells, Cell and Gene Therapy Biotechs to Discuss Capital Formation Strategies and Validation

NEW YORK – In a progressive cell therapy environment that has decreasing clinical attrition, next generation and next-to-launch biotechs along with regulators, will be talking about current strategies and approaches to advance the development of stem cells, cell and gene therapies.

Over 250 biotechs, biopharma, research institutions and regulators will gather at the Stem Cells USA & Regenerative Medicine Congress on September 30 – October 1, 2013.

New method to produce blood cells from stem cells could yield a purer, safer cell therapy

A new protocol for reprogramming induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into mature blood cells, using just a small amount of the patient’s own blood and a readily available cell type, is reported on in the current issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine. This novel method skips the generally accepted process of mixing iPSCs with either mouse or human stromal cells during the differentiation process and, in essence, ensures no outside and potentially harmful DNA is introduced into the reprogrammed cells.

As such, it could lead to a purer, safer therapeutic grade of stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

The discovery of iPSCs holds great promise for regenerative medicine since it is possible to produce patient-specific iPSCs from the individual for potential autologous treatment — that is, treatment using the patient’s own cells. This avoids the possibility of rejection and numerous other harmful side effects.

Novel liver stem cell model could speed up process for developing new drugs

Durham, NC – The path to bringing a new drug to market is, simply put, a rocky one. Not only is it estimated to take over 12 years at an average price tag running anywhere between US $800 million and US $2 billion, but more often than not the new drug never makes it through the process.

But now a research team reports that it has developed a way to speed up the process. Their work, which involves the creation of a highly stable and sensitive liver stem cell model, is reported in the latest issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

“Liver toxicity is the second most common cause of human drug failure,” explained David Hay, Ph.D., of the University of Edinburgh’s MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, who led the team made up of university colleagues and scientists from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, N.J. “But one major bottleneck in safety testing new drugs has been finding a routine supply of good quality primary human hepatocytes from the desired genetic background.”

Scientists have long believed that finding an efficient way to force pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to develop into hepatocytes — liver cells — could be the way around the problem. “But faithfully recapitulating human physiology in a dish from a renewable source remains a holy grail for medicine and the pharmaceutical industry,” Dr. Hay noted.

“Many procedures have been described that, to a limited extent, exhibit human-tissue-specific function in vitro but incomplete cellular differentiation and/or the loss of cell phenotype after they differentiate. Using our knowledge in pharmacology, stem cell biology and materials chemistry, we developed a highly stable and sensitive model.”

Their method involved expanding PSCs and driving their differentiation to hepatocytes, then replating them onto a synthetic surface. The results yielded active cell populations that displayed stable function for over two weeks in vitro.

“The scalable nature of our model combined with the interchangeable genetic element demonstrates clear advantages over the erratic supply of highly variable human hepatocytes from deceased specimens,” Dr. Hay added. “We believe our approach is important and will likely contribute to improvements in drug safety testing.”

“This model was compared to human liver cells from deceased donors and found to be equivalent, suggesting that stem cell-derived hepatocyles have potential to improve the preclinical assessment of human liver toxicity,” said Anthony Atala, M.D., Editor of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine.”

The full article, “Developing high fidelity hepatotoxicity models from pluripotent stem cells,” can be accessed at http://www.stemcellstm.com

Young Girl Receives Lifesaving Windpipe Transplant Made From Her Stem Cells

Hannah Warren was born without a trachea but now has one made from plastic fibers and a stew of her own stem cells.

The 2-year-old Korean Canadian has spent every day of her life in intensive care, kept alive by a tube that substituted for the windpipe that was supposed to connect her mouth to her lungs. But nearly a month after her transplant, the toddler is mostly breathing on her own and is responding to doctors and nurses.

The surgery, pioneered by Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, director of the Advanced Center for Translational Regenerative Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, was only the sixth performed in the world, and Hannah was the youngest patient and first to receive the transplant in the U.S. The procedure was approved by the FDA as an experimental operation for patients with very little hope of survival; being born without a trachea is fatal in 99% of cases.

For complete article see Time.com