Tag Archives: cell-lines

New human embryonic stem cell lines eligible for federal research dollars for the first time since 2001

By Karen Kaplan,  LATimes.com

The number of human embryonic stem cell lines eligible to be used in government-funded research just went up by 13.

The National Institutes of Health announced today that 11 new cell lines from Dr. George Daley at Children’s Hospital Boston and two lines from Ali Brivanlou at Rockefeller University in New York became the first additions to the NIH Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry since President Obama reversed his predecessor’s policy. Under President Bush, only human embryonic stem cells prior to August 2001 were eligible for federal funding.

The new lines were derived from embryos created for fertility treatments and donated by couples who went through a rigorous informed consent process.

And more may be on the way. The NIH said that 96 more lines have been submitted by researchers, including 20 that will be vetted by an advisory committee on Friday.

The additions come nearly nine months after Obama signed an executive order that directed the NIH to make federal research funds available to newer lines of human embryonic stem cells. Scientists were overjoyed and said the decision would accelerate the pace of research into such ailments as diabetes, Alzheimer’s and spinal cord injuries. Details of the policy are available here.

U.S. Stem Cell Research Seems to Focus on Two Lines

From Drugs.com

Only two of 21 approved human embryonic stem cell lines are routinely used by researchers in the United States, says a new study.

The study found that two cell lines, known as H1 and H9, accounted for 941 of 1,217 requests, or 77 percent, placed by scientists since 1999 for human embryonic stem cell lines housed at the two largest stem cell banks in the country.

Another line, H7, was requested 111 times, and 13 other lines were requested fewer than 10 times.

The study’s authors also found that H9 was discussed in 83 percent of 534 published studies from 1999 to 2008, H1 was discussed in 61 percent and H7 in 24 percent. The total is more than 100 percent because many studies used more than one cell line.

“I was surprised by the results,” Christopher Scott, director of Stanford University’s Program on Stem Cells in Society, said in a news release. “I never imagined that we would find that three-fourths of the requests would be for the same two cell lines.”

The study appears in the Aug. 7 issue of Nature Biotechnology.

Scott and his fellow researchers said the findings raise concerns about the reauthorization process of stem cell lines under way at the U.S. National Institutes of Health. If the lines that have been in use are excluded from federal funding because of ethical considerations, they said, scientists might abandon research on them in favor of other cell lines.

However, they added, the two most-used lines might have abnormalities or other characteristics that would make them less useful than newer lines.

Future NIH policies should preserve scientists’ ability to continue work on the well-studied lines while also encouraging the study of ne

Cellartis Deposits Cell Lines with U.S. National Stem Cell Bank

All NIH Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry Lines Now on Deposit at NSCB

January 12, 2009, Madison, Wis.–The U.S. National Stem Cell Bank (NSCB) has announced that it has received deposits of two human embryonic stem cell lines from Cellartis AB, a biotechnology company based in Sweden. With the addition of the new lines, the National Stem Cell Bank now has received all 21 cell lines from the six providers listed on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) federal registry.

Currently, 16 of these lines have completed the NSCB’s extensive quality control process and are available for distribution to research scientists around the world. The NSCB’s initial testing process, which can take several months or longer to finalize, begins upon receipt of a new cell line and is carried out to ensure the identity of the cell line, cell characteristics and that the starting cell material is free from contaminants.

The NIH established the country’s first National Stem Cell Bank at the WiCell™ Research Institute, a private, nonprofit supporting organization to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in September 2005. Its mission is to obtain, characterize and distribute the 21 human embryonic stem cell lines that currently may be used in U.S. federally funded research. All six providers of the NIH-registry stem cell lines – WiCell at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of California, San Francisco and Novocell in the U.S.; ES Cell International (ESI) in Singapore; Technion in Israel; and Cellartis in Sweden – were invited to deposit their cells by the NSCB shortly after it was established.

Derek Hei, a University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and leader of the National Stem Cell Bank, says the availability of a variety of human embryonic stem cell lines for study is critical to advancing the field. “The addition of the Cellartis lines to the National Stem Cell Bank is extremely important because now we’ll be able to distribute these lines to the worldwide research community,” he states. “We’ll also be able to generate data unique to these lines that is valuable to the advancement of stem cell research.”

Mats Lundwall, CEO of Cellartis, says, “We are delighted to have this collaboration with the U.S. National Stem Cell Bank that will increase the amount of NIH eligible lines readily available in the U.S. The Cellartis cell lines are among the most extensively characterized in the world and now their distribution within the U.S. has been further facilitated through this partnership.”

See NationalStemCellBank.org for complete article.