Tag Archives: cord-blood

TechKnow: Banking cord blood to save lives

This Saturday, July 19th at 7:30 pm ET/4:30 pm PT (Repeats 10:30P ET/7:30P PT), Al Jazeera America’s “TechKnow” shows us one of the most exiting areas of medical research – how umbilical cord blood is being used to treat brain disease and injury.

“Techknow” host and mechanical engineer Dr. Shini Somara takes us inside Duke Children’s Hospital, where a team of doctors is treating young Grace Matthews, an infant with hydrocephalus, or water on the brain, characterized by the tell-tale swelling of the baby’s head. We go behind-the-scenes on the high-tech experimental treatments, as doctors infuse Grace with stem cells from her own umbilical cord, and we meet another young patient who experienced “miraculous” progress from the use of umbilical cord stem cells.

Survey: Americans Favor Expanded Cord Blood Stem Cell Research

SAN BRUNO, Calif., July 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Far from being sharply divided, the American people are in broad support of more stem cell research, according to the results of an online survey released today by Cord Blood Registry® (CBR®) to coincide with National Cord Blood Awareness Month.

The poll included responses from 1,130 individuals to reveal: their belief in the need for continued research to rapidly bring stem cell therapies to the clinic; their level of awareness and understanding of umbilical cord blood as a source of stem cells; and their familiarity with the use of cord blood stem cells in established and experimental therapies.

The survey found that nearly 9 of 10 Americans either agree or strongly agree that further research should be conducted to investigate the potential of stem cells to stimulate the body’s own repair mechanisms to heal tissues or organs. In addition, the survey results indicate that more than 75% of Americans are aware of stem cell research to develop more effective treatments for conditions and diseases such as Alzheimer’s, brain injury, and cancer. The survey also shows that 8 in 10 Americans believe in the medical benefits of stem cell research and would like to learn more about therapeutic strategies which augment, repair, replace or regenerate organs and tissues.

Meet Cord Blood Registry’s Leader of Laboratory Operations

Cord Blood Registry takes pride in leading the cord blood banking industry with its state-of-the-art lab. Meet Kristen, who leads the effort to make sure we’re providing our clients with the best once their babies’ stem cells arrive in Tucson. Kristen is one of the many people who make sure that, from that first phone call to the day your baby’s stem cells are collected and stored, you receive the industry’s best service and support. For more information on CBR’s processes, visit: http://www.cordblood.com/best-cord-blood-bank/best-cord-blood-banks/?mtag=JCPH.

Learn more about cord blood stem cells here http://www.cordblood.com/?mtag=JCPH.

CBR: Umbilical Stem Cell Overview

Cord Blood Registry Launches Industry-Leading Innovations for Newborn Stem Cell Collection

New Collection System Offers Parents Opportunity to Preserve a Greater Number and Diversity of Their Newborn’s Umbilical Cord Stem Cells for More Potential Therapeutic Uses

Cord Blood Registry (CBR), the global leader in the collection and preservation of newborn stem cells from the umbilical cord, announced today the launch of its new stem cell collection system that saves a greater number and diversity of a newborn’s stem cells – from both the blood in the umbilical cord and the cord tissue itself – for a wider range of potential therapeutic uses.

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First Successful Use of Expanded Umbilical-Cord Blood Units to Treat Leukemia

ScienceDaily (Jan. 18, 2010) — Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have cleared a major technical hurdle to making umbilical-cord-blood transplants a more widely-used method for treating leukemia and other blood cancers.

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Primetime Special on Cord Blood Stem Cell Therapy

Two cerebral palsy patients and CBR clients who are experiencing positive results after undergoing reinfusion of their own cord blood stem cells were featured on the NBC San Francisco Bay Area show Health Matters: Stem Cell Therapy Today & Tomorrow.

Placentas could be an important source of stem cells to fight disease

By Sandy Kleffman, Contra Costa Times

The human placenta could be an important source of stem cells for curing leukemia, sickle cell disease and other blood-related disorders, a new study reveals.

These stem cells appear to have distinct advantages over the techniques currently used to fight such diseases, and they may one day provide an alternative treatment for people who cannot find matching bone marrow donors, researchers said.

Scientists at Children’s Hospital Oakland obtained placentas from consenting women who had cesarean sections at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Berkeley.

They found that the placentas contained large numbers of blood-producing stem cells, which they were able to remove and grow in a cell culture.

“Yes, the potential is there,” said senior scientist Frans Kuypers. “Yes, you can get them out, and yes, they’re viable.”

One big advantage of such stem cells is that they do not require the perfect match needed for those who have bone marrow transplants, Kuypers said, because they do not trigger the same strong immune system response.

Today, scientists often seek to cure people who have leukemia and other blood-related disorders by giving them stem cell-rich bone marrow from donors who have closely matched tissue types. The transplanted bone marrow makes healthy blood cells to replace the faulty ones.

But if the donor has a different tissue type, the recipient’s body will not recognize the new cells and will attack them, leading to what is known as graft-versus-host disease.

The placental stem cells, like umbilical cord blood, “are much more tolerant with respect to matching,” Kuypers said.

The findings, which will appear in the July issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine, could represent especially good news for African-Americans, Asians and multiracial individuals, who often have difficulty obtaining compatible bone marrow donors.

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