Tag Archives: iPSC

The Beauty Of Pluripotent Stem Cells – Great Intro

By Muhammad Khan, TEDxBrentwoodCollegeSchool

Stem cells are extremely new to science, and research (despite being hindered) is advancing at an amazing pace. In 2012 a man named Shinya Yamanaka made the ground breaking discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells – essentially a cell that is reprogrammed into thinking it is a stem cell and behaves exactly as a stem cell would. The technology and possibilities that Shinya Yamanaka unlocked with this discovery is mind boggling, the possibilities are endless especially because it removes the ethical debate of stem cells being potential children.

I am a 17 year old student at Brentwood, this is both my first and last year and I’m looking forward to an amazing one. I’ve always been interested in science, in particular the medical sciences have always fascinated me. Growing up I’d always look for new science news and through all of that I found the amazing science of stem cells. Since then, they have been a huge interest of mine, so much so that I voluntarily did an extended essay on it. Bringing that interest and fascination to people who might not be so interested in science is something that I am really looking forward to with this talk.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

New method to produce blood cells from stem cells could yield a purer, safer cell therapy

A new protocol for reprogramming induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into mature blood cells, using just a small amount of the patient’s own blood and a readily available cell type, is reported on in the current issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine. This novel method skips the generally accepted process of mixing iPSCs with either mouse or human stromal cells during the differentiation process and, in essence, ensures no outside and potentially harmful DNA is introduced into the reprogrammed cells.

As such, it could lead to a purer, safer therapeutic grade of stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

The discovery of iPSCs holds great promise for regenerative medicine since it is possible to produce patient-specific iPSCs from the individual for potential autologous treatment — that is, treatment using the patient’s own cells. This avoids the possibility of rejection and numerous other harmful side effects.