Tag Archives: stem cells

Stem Cell Injection May Soon Reverse Vision Loss Caused By Age-Related Macular Degeneration

An injection of stem cells into the eye may soon slow or reverse the effects of early-stage age-related macular degeneration, according to new research from scientists at Cedars-Sinai. Currently, there is no treatment that slows the progression of the disease, which is the leading cause of vision loss in people over 65.

“This is the first study to show preservation of vision after a single injection of adult-derived human cells into a rat model with age-related macular degeneration,” said Shaomei Wang, MD, PhD, lead author of the study published in the journal STEM CELLS and a research scientist in the Eye Program at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute.

The stem cell injection resulted in 130 days of preserved vision in laboratory rats, which roughly equates to 16 years in humans.

Engineering Stem Cells: From In Vitro to In Situ


Engineering Stem Cells: From In Vitro to In Situ

Stem cells are a valuable cell source for tissue engineering, disease modeling and drug screening. A recent discovery in stem cell biology is that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and desired cell types. Although the effects of transcriptional factors and chemical compounds have been widely studied, the role of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not clear. Dr. Li will present his findings on how biophysical factors can regulate the epigenetic state and thus the cell memory and reprogramming process, which has important implications in cell conversion into iPSCs and specific cell types. To illustrate the important role played by stem cells in tissue regeneration and remodeling in vivo, Dr. Li will use blood vessel regeneration as an example to demonstrate an evolution from in vitro tissue engineering to in situ tissue engineering approach. In this approach, endogenous stem cells are recruited by the use of bioactive scaffolds to promote tissue regeneration. In addition, endogenous stem cells are also involved in the regeneration of microvessels and the development of vascular diseases, suggesting a general role of stem cells in vascular remodeling.

Stem Cells Show Promise in Reducing Hardening of the Arteries

Durham, NC – The medical world is excited about the potential that stem cells have demonstrated in aiding the recovery of patients who have suffered a heart attack. Now, a new study appearing in the January issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that stem cells may also benefit those who suffer from hardening of the arteries.

Hardening of the arteries – or atherosclerosis – occurs due to a buildup of fats, cholesterol and other substances in and on the artery walls. The arteries become hardened by fibrous tissue and calcification and, as the plaque grows, it clogs the artery tubes, reducing the oxygen and blood supply to the affected organ. If the artery becomes severely blocked, it can cause death of the tissue fed by the artery and lead to a heart attack or stoke.

Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy May Heal Heart Damage Caused by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that injections of cardiac stem cells might help reverse heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially resulting in a longer life expectancy for patients with the chronic muscle-wasting disease.

The study results were presented today at a Breaking Basic Science presentation during the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago. After laboratory mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were infused with cardiac stem cells, the mice showed steady, marked improvement in heart function and increased exercise capacity.

Utilizing Oral Mucosa Stem Cells for the Prevention and Treatment of Ischemic Heart Failure

Lecture by Dr. Yosef Gafni, PhD, DMD

Advancing Toward Multiple Sclerosis Therapies Using Stem Cells

Dr. Tom Lane of the University of Utah (formerly a CIRM grantee at UC – Irvine) describes his lab’s experimental results that show a dramatic reversal in the debilitating effects of a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness in mice after treating them with human neural stem cells. After just two weeks, the mice—who had previously been unable to walk or even feed themselves—had regained basic motor skills. And six months later the improvements have only continued.

For more info about the California stem cell agency’s MS research funding, visit fact sheet: http://go.usa.gov/84sP

A Changing View of Bone Marrow Cells

Caltech researchers show that the cells are actively involved in sensing infection.

RESEARCHERS SEPARATE BLOOD STEM CELLS FROM OTHER BONE MARROW CELLS AND LOAD THEM ONTO A NEW MICROFLUIDIC CHIP. FLUORESCENT SIGNALS INDICATE THE PRESENCE OF SECRETED PROTEINS WITH ONE "BARCODE" REPRESENTING EACH CELL.

RESEARCHERS SEPARATE BLOOD STEM CELLS FROM OTHER BONE MARROW CELLS AND LOAD THEM ONTO A NEW MICROFLUIDIC CHIP. FLUORESCENT SIGNALS INDICATE THE PRESENCE OF SECRETED PROTEINS WITH ONE “BARCODE” REPRESENTING EACH CELL.

In the battle against infection, immune cells are the body’s offense and defense—some cells go on the attack while others block invading pathogens. It has long been known that a population of blood stem cells that resides in the bone marrow generates all of these immune cells. But most scientists have believed that blood stem cells participate in battles against infection in a delayed way, replenishing immune cells on the front line only after they become depleted.

Now, using a novel microfluidic technique, researchers at Caltech have shown that these stem cells might be more actively involved, sensing danger signals directly and quickly producing new immune cells to join the fight.

“It has been most people’s belief that the bone marrow has the function of making these cells but that the response to infection is something that happens locally, at the infection site,” says David Baltimore, president emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech. “We’ve shown that these bone marrow cells themselves are sensitive to infection-related molecules and that they respond very rapidly. So the bone marrow is actually set up to respond to infection.”

High hopes for space grown stem cells

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are preparing to test their theory that stem cells grow faster in microgravity. With a grant from an organisation that promotes research aboard the International Space Station, Dr Abba Zubair will send a batch of cells into space where he believes the future of human tissue generation with stem cells may lie. Ben Gruber reports.

Video provided by Reuters

A Brief History of Stem Cells

A timeline spanning 60 years of stem cell research.
Reporting by Kevin Mayer/ Video by Sunya Bhutta
From GEN Publishing

Stem Cells, and Blood Cells, and Blood Counts, Oh My!

University of California, San Francisco, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public